May 2021

ARCs

The Sword Falls – by A.J. Smith (5/01)

Goodreads

A man of the Dawn Claw will be the Always King. It will ever be so. They will always rule… but they will not always lead.

Prince Oliver Dawn Claw, heir to the Kingdom of the Four Claws, is thrust into a world he doesn’t understand as he waits for his father to die. Away from home, with few allies, and too many enemies, he faces a new and otherworldly threat to the Eastron from beneath the sea. Alliances break and masks fall, as the Dark Brethren reveal their true master.

Meanwhile, Adeline Brand, called the Alpha Wolf, refuses to wait, and becomes the edge of the sword that swings back at the Dreaming God. Assembling allies and crushing resistance, she enters a fight she doesn’t know if she can win, as the sea begins to rise.

Shadow of the Gods – by John Gwynne (5/04)

Goodreads

After the gods warred and drove themselves to extinction, the cataclysm of their fall shattered the land of Vigrið.

Now a new world is rising, where power-hungry jarls feud and monsters stalk the woods and mountains. A world where the bones of the dead gods still hold great power for those braveor desperateenough to seek them out.

Now, as whispers of war echo across the mountains and fjords, fate follows in the footsteps of three people: a huntress on a dangerous quest, a noblewoman who has rejected privilege in pursuit of battle fame, and a thrall who seeks vengeance among the famed mercenaries known as the Bloodsworn.

All three will shape the fate of the world as it once more falls under the shadow of the gods . . .

Within Without – by Jeff Noon (5/11)

Goodreads

In the year 1960, rock and roll star Vince Craven hires private eye John Nyquist in his strangest case yet: to track down Vince’s image, long lost in a city of million borders.

The Apocalypse Seven – by Gene Doucette (5/25)

Goodreads

This is the way the world ends. Not with a bang, but a whatever.

The whateverpocalypse. That’s what Touré, a twenty-something Cambridge coder, calls it after waking up one morning to find himself seemingly the only person left in the city. Once he finds Robbie and Carol, two equally disoriented Harvard freshmen, he realizes he isn’t alone, but the name sticks: Whateverpocalypse. But it doesn’t explain where everyone went. It doesn’t explain how the city became overgrown with vegetation in the space of a night. Or how wild animals with no fear of humans came to roam the streets.

Add freakish weather to the mix, swings of temperature that spawn tornadoes one minute and snowstorms the next, and it seems things can’t get much weirder. Yet even as a handful of new survivors appear—Paul, a preacher as quick with a gun as a Bible verse; Win, a young professional with a horse; Bethany, a thirteen-year-old juvenile delinquent; and Ananda, an MIT astrophysics adjunct—life in Cambridge, Massachusetts gets stranger and stranger.

The self-styled Apocalypse Seven are tired of questions with no answers. Tired of being hunted by things seen and unseen. Now, armed with curiosity, desperation, a shotgun, and a bow, they become the hunters. And that’s when things truly get weird.

The Lights of Prague – by Nicole Jarvis (5/25)

Goodreads

I got granted this one just a couple days ago, requesting it after reading Rebecca’s review on Powder & Page.

In the quiet streets of Prague all manner of otherworldly creatures lurk in the shadows. Unbeknownst to its citizens, their only hope against the tide of predators are the dauntless lamplighters – a secret elite of monster hunters whose light staves off the darkness each night. Domek Myska leads a life teeming with fraught encounters with the worst kind of evil: pijavice, bloodthirsty and soulless vampiric creatures. Despite this, Domek find solace in his moments spent in the company of his friend, the clever and beautiful Lady Ora Fischerová– a widow with secrets of her own.

When Domek finds himself stalked by the spirit of the White Lady – a ghost who haunts the baroque halls of Prague castle – he stumbles across the sentient essence of a will-o’-the-wisp, a mischievous spirit known to lead lost travelers to their death, but who, once captured, are bound to serve the desires of their owners.

After discovering a conspiracy amongst the pijavice that could see them unleash terror on the daylight world, Domek finds himself in a race against those who aim to twist alchemical science for their own dangerous gain.

Other Releases

Project Hail Mary – by Andy Weir (5/04)

Goodreads

Ryland Grace is the sole survivor on a desperate, last-chance mission – and if he fails, humanity and the earth itself will perish.

Except that right now, he doesn’t know that. He can’t even remember his own name, let alone the nature of his assignment or how to complete it.

All he knows is that he’s been asleep for a very, very long time. And he’s just been awakened to find himself millions of miles from home, with nothing but two corpses for company.

His crew mates dead, his memories fuzzily returning, he realises that an impossible task now confronts him. Alone on this tiny ship that’s been cobbled together by every government and space agency on the planet and hurled into the depths of space, it’s up to him to conquer an extinction-level threat to our species.

And thanks to an unexpected ally, he just might have a chance.

Son of the Storm – by Suyi Davies Okungbowa (5/11)

Goodreads

In the ancient city of Bassa, Danso is a clever scholar on the cusp of achieving greatness—only he doesn’t want it. Instead, he prefers to chase forbidden stories about what lies outside the city walls. The Bassai elite claim there is nothing of interest. The city’s immigrants are sworn to secrecy.

But when Danso stumbles across a warrior wielding magic that shouldn’t exist, he’s put on a collision course with Bassa’s darkest secrets. Drawn into the city’s hidden history, he sets out on a journey beyond its borders. And the chaos left in the wake of his discovery threatens to destroy the empire.

Hard Reboot – by Django Wexler (5/25)

Goodreads

Kas is a junior researcher on a fact-finding mission to old Earth. But when a con-artist tricks her into wagering a large sum of money belonging to her university on the outcome of a manned robot arena battle she becomes drawn into the seedy underworld of old Earth politics and state-sponsored battle-droid prizefights.

Is it time to get back to the books, yet?

The Blacktongue Thief – by Christoper Buehlman (5/27)

Goodreads

Kinch Na Shannack owes the Takers Guild a small fortune for his education as a thief, which includes (but is not limited to) lock-picking, knife-fighting, wall-scaling, fall-breaking, lie-weaving, trap-making, plus a few small magics. His debt has driven him to lie in wait by the old forest road, planning to rob the next traveler that crosses his path.

But today, Kinch Na Shannack has picked the wrong mark.

Galva is a knight, a survivor of the brutal goblin wars, and handmaiden of the goddess of death. She is searching for her queen, missing since a distant northern city fell to giants.

Unsuccessful in his robbery and lucky to escape with his life, Kinch now finds his fate entangled with Galva’s. Common enemies and uncommon dangers force thief and knight on an epic journey where goblins hunger for human flesh, krakens hunt in dark waters, and honor is a luxury few can afford.

Purchases

The Thousand Deaths of Ardor Benn – by Tyler Whitesides

Goodreads

Ardor Benn is no ordinary thief. Rakish, ambitious, and master of wildly complex heists, he styles himself a Ruse Artist Extraordinaire.

When a priest hires him for the most daring ruse yet, Ardor knows he’ll need more than quick wit and sleight of hand. Assembling a dream team of forgers, disguisers, schemers, and thieves, he sets out to steal from the most powerful king the realm has ever known.

But it soon becomes clear there’s more at stake than fame and glory—Ard and his team might just be the last hope for human civilization.

The Body Library – by Jeff Noon

Goodreads

In a city dissolving into an infected sprawl of ideas, where words come to life and reality is contaminated by stories, John Nyquist wakes up in a room with a dead body… The dead man’s impossible whispers plunge him into a murder investigation like no other. Clues point him deeper into an unfolding story infesting its participants as reality blurs between place and genre.

Only one man can hope to put it all back together into some kind of order, enough that lives can be saved… That man is Nyquist, and he is lost.

The Traitor God – by Cameron Johnson

Goodreads

After ten years on the run, dodging daemons and debt, reviled magician Edrin Walker returns home to avenge the brutal murder of his friend. Lynas had uncovered a terrible secret, something that threatened to devour the entire city. He tried to warn the Arcanum, the sorcerers who rule the city. He failed. Lynas was skinned alive and Walker felt every cut. Now nothing will stop him from finding the murderer. Magi, mortals, daemons, and even the gods—Walker will burn them all if he has to. After all, it wouldn’t be the first time he’s killed a god…

Music

I gave it a once-over but couldn’t find anything I was interested in releasing this month. Now, there’ll probably be some album releasing that I missed, and there will doubtless be singles dropping, but for the moment I’ll just share a couple of my favorite singles from April.

Both are from Europe, I think. Smash into Pieces is Swedish. I’m not sure where Cosmodrome is from, but they speak English in what sounds like a Slavic tongue so… Russian? Lithuanian? They actually have a single out on May 1st, so I’ll probably feature it sometime next week assuming it’s any good.

A brand new Starset single came out while I was editing this piece. It’s a good song (not their best, but), a bit of a callback to Vessels. Not Transmissions level good, but not bad by any rate.

Currently Reading

A Necessary Evil – by Abir Mukherjee

Goodreads

The second Sam Wyndham mystery returns to 1920’s India, a land full of different religions, ethnicities and beliefs all thrown together and tucked under British Rule. Fresh off ruining his chances with Annie, Sam of course can’t get her out of his head. Meanwhile, the murder of a Maharajah’s heir pulls Sam and Banerjee out of Kolkata and north into the jungles of the Indian subcontinent. Here, in a somewhat autonomous kingdom, conspiracy and tension abound, and Wyndham and Banerjee must unravel the mystery before they become mere footnotes in yet another murder.

So far I’m quite enjoying my return to Colonial India. Hopefully the series’ll continue to deliver!

Voidbreaker – by David Dalglish

Goodreads

The conclusion to the Keepers trilogy finds all the threads come together at the most uncertain time. Though Adria and Devin have always lived for each other, Adria’s changing nature and Devin’s standing in the Order is straining their bond. And will her latest actions bring the two closer or tear them apart? And as the lines continue to blur, just whose side is each on?

Gaming

Where the Water Tastes Like Wine is a narrative-adventure game developed by Dim Bulb Games and Serenity Forge. Set in mid-20th century America, it finds a rough luck drifter stuck with a debt to some supernatural being. As the game’s lead protagonist, you’re tasked with collecting stories of the people that roam the land. Myths and legends come from somewhere, and over the course of the 15-30 hours you spend in the world, you’ll see how these tales originate and how they evolve through the telling. It’s an interesting premise and employs a few intriguing mechanics that I’d like to dig further into at a later time. I’m only about 5 hours in right now and… it’s fun so far. It’s keeping my attention, mostly. The travel mechanic seriously needs an overhaul, and it seems like there’s not enough consequence to one’s actions (or it doesn’t feel like it), but the gameplay is fun and interesting, and collecting all the stories and seeing how they evolve is becoming somewhat addictive.

Life

Got my second vaccine recently, and life came to a standstill while I got over the mini-COVID burst it instilled. Montana is one of the leading states in the nation in vaccine availability—due in large part to the number of anti-vaxers, deniers, anti-government types and COVID hoax people. Most places that have the vaccine here have started offering door prizes, gift cards, or other incentives to encourage people to get vaccinated. Furthermore, there’s be a marked rise in those that got their first dose only to skip their second. I understand their hesitation (I mean, I understand the hesitation to get something that has been largely untested on a large populace and may or may not have long-term side effects that haven’t manifested yet), but COVID and its recent strains are quite frankly terrifying. I’ve lived here long enough that I kinda even get some people’s hesitance to trust the government (to a degree), or accept the official story to anything.

Montana is roughly the size 380,000 sq. kilometers, which makes it slightly bigger than Japan or Germany. But where those other nations have 125 and 83 million people, respectively, we’re sitting at just over a million. Big, wide open spaces. Lots of undeveloped land, pasture, and forest. Small communities, spread out; between 15-20 towns of more than 5,000 people, 7 over 10k, and only 1 at around 100,000. People here spent the first half of 2020 hearing about the deadly pandemic without really seeing any effect of it. Some people here have a… unique mindset. Not everyone, mind. But especially those in rural communities, hundreds of miles from any town pushing 5,000, might go the entire year without getting COVID or meeting someone who had. Most towns here don’t have a police station, a hospital, or a fire station. They really on their own resources with help from their neighbors. The government doesn’t really play into day-today life. And so when the government came out telling people to beware the deadly deadly virus, most people didn’t take notice. Because they didn’t see it.

I live on the outskirts of one of the most liberal cities in my state. Missoula is a college town pushing about 80k. Most folks around here are better at masking, distancing, getting the vaccine, and usually vote blue. The rest of the state… not so much. Ever since these things became political we were doomed. I’m not really political. Half my friends bleed red and the other bleed blue. This last year divided everyone terribly. With the vaccine being deployed a bunch of us thought maybe those tensions could dial down a bit—but… nope, apparently not. Oh well.

Sorry that turned into a bit of a geography lesson but… “the more you know”, right?

Book Loot – Christmas 2020 & January 2021

Didn’t get a ton of books for Christmas this year, for whatever reason. Combined with the amount I was working over the holidays and an inherent lethargy on my part, I didn’t get a haul post done for December. Not that I bought a bunch of books during Ketchup Month anyhow (nor did I get much in the way of catch-up done). So we’ll just combine December and January here.

ARCs for January

The Scorpion’s Tail – by Preston & Child (1/07 UK • 1/12 US)

The second Nora Kelly/Corrie Swanson spinoff features our favorite duo in the wastes of New Mexico and includes a gold cross, a mummified corpse, a missing gold mine, and a famed event in US/World history.

Doors of Sleep – by Tim Pratt (1/12)

My first Pratt book, Doors of Sleep features capital-T Traveler Zaxony Delatree, who travels to a new universe every time he falls asleep. Seriously, that’s all I needed to hear about this one to want to read it. If that’s not enough for you, there’s also an enemy, the fate of the multiverse, and a talking crystal.

Fable – by Adrienne Young (1/26 UK)

A title I thoroughly regretted missing in 2020 despite its mixed reviews gets a release in the UK, which allows me to score a review copy. This survival YA features 17-year-old trader Fable in a quest to find her missing father and reclaim her place at the head of his trading empire. There’s some pirates, a desert island, and a good quest—always solid.

Extraterrestrial – by Avi Loeb (1/26)

The science entry well-known astrophysicist Avi Loeb examines the possibility that the first extrasolar object that we know of to enter our solar system—’Oumuamua, which passed through in 2017—was in fact a sign of extraterrestrial life. Though it’s not a common theory in academia, it is quite the hypothesis, and one that made highly interesting read!

Purchases

I decided to re-up Audible this year, but had a few credits to use before they expire later this month. Enter a flurry of new books:

A Rising Man – by Abir Mukherjee

Set during Colonial India, Captain Sam Wyndham arrives in Kolkata to investigate the murder of a senior crown official, whose death comes at a time of rising tensions and dissent between the empire and the colony. Taking him luxurious palaces to seedy opium dens, the mystery will test all of Wyndham’s skill set—and may just prove too much for him altogether.

Warrior of the Altaii – by Robert Jordan

Meant to be the first in a brand new series, this standalone was published posthumously in 2019. As the plains dry up, Wulfgar of the Altaii must lead his people past dangers, wizards and prophets in order to secure their future.

Trail of Lightning – by Rebecca Roanhorse

The rise of the sea has wrought an apocalypse but also somehow returned gods and daemons to once more walk the land. Maggie Hoskie is a monster hunter tasked with returning a missing girl to her small town. But the truth behind the girl’s disappearance may well unearth secrets better left buried—particularly those of Maggie herself.

Great North Road – by Peter F. Hamilton

What do a murdered clone, a convicted killer, and an alien monster have in common? Well, for one, they’re all featured in the blurb for this book. An absolute brick of a tome, this Hamilton novel features an investigator, wormhole tech, and maybe some aliens. It’s a lengthy one—that I’ve had on my TBR for years but has always intimidated me with its sheer size.

Gifts

Rhythm of War – by Brandon Sanderson

I’m not even going to introduce this one. It’s self-explanatory. Might take me a bit to get to what with the Stormlight reread and all—but I WILL GET THERE. And I can’t imagine it won’t be worth the wait, but I still kinda want to read it straightaway.

Made Things – by Adrian Tchaikovsky

Coppelia is a street thief, one very good at making friends. But instead of flesh, some of her friends are made out of wood or steel. Their partnership is sometimes tenuous, but mostly solid. But when a threat threatens (“threat threatens”, yeah I know) their city, these friends must solve it together, or die apart. Not a huge novella fan, but Tchaikovsky is an obvious exception to that.

So, these are the swags for this January/December. As of writing this, the world is… I seriously have no words. I just… I just don’t know anymore. Anyway, lemme know if you’ve read any of these, or if there’re others I should have on my radar. Everyone keep safe and be well!

Book Loot – October / Updates

So… 2020’s almost over. Which is pretty nice. The pandemic isn’t in a great place right now, with nearly 200k new cases daily in the US. Politics really aren’t any better, with our current Commander in Chief refusing to acknowledge the pandemic at all, while it rages. He also refuses to accept other things, but let’s not get into that. My own anxiety is pretty dang high, as I’m working six days a week somehow. And half of them are surrounded by people. And people in my state continue to ignore the whole mask thing. But let’s not dwell on that.

At the moment, I have no new ARCs for December. I only requested one, and haven’t heard back about Memoria. So, I’m assuming that this’ll be my catch-up month. But we’ll address that later. First, for what I collected this month:

Purchases

Forged – by Benedict Jacka

Eleventh of a planned twelve in the series, Forged comes at a time when SHRHTF for Alex. I won’t spoil it for those of you who are behind and have any interest, but sufficient to say that we’re seeing a new, uncut Verus who’s in it to win it. I can’t wait to tuck into this—right after I finish Blood of Empire!

Planetside – by Michael Mammay

I was planning on waiting til it actually got here to declare it as loot, but whatever. I’ve heard good things about this series (particularly from Niki), so went out and got a used copy. As I’ve no ARCs for December, and I seriously underperformed with regards to scifi month—figured this was the perfect time.

Purchased Games

Since I bought more new games this month (all during black friday sales (all online, I might add) where I’ve apparently no constraint), I figured I might at least talk those up. I’ve always planned on having more of a gaming presence on here but haven’t really ever gotten around to it. Maybe this’ll help (I guess we’ll see).

Horizon: Zero Dawn Complete

This was an impulse thing. It was on sale, I’ve heard great things about it, so here we are. I pretty much just doubled my game haul for the year in one week. I’ll probably get to this sometime next year—here’s hoping it’s good!

Control: Ultimate Edition

This game I’ve wanted pretty much since it’s release but held off because of some news of lag and glitches. But from what I’ve heard those are pretty much patched by now and I’ve managed to get the game and dlc on sale. I’m… pretty excited to get into this. Not as much as Cyberpunk, but close.

Borderlands 3

One of my favorite co-op series, I don’t play much Borderlands by myself. But as some of my friends are locked away, I managed to B1G1 free and figured I’d gift someone a copy to play it with me. If anyone reading this owns it already and has any interest in some co-op, do let me know, eh?

In terms of news… well we’ve pretty much covered it, right? The US sucks right now. Y’all stay safe, y’hear? I’ve a nasty cold this week that wiped my schedule clean—apparently if you have 2+ COVID symptoms you’re required to quarantine or get a test, but they’re desperate around here as everybody has it—so I actually got some rest in. But since I felt pretty awful during most of the week, I didn’t really get to enjoy much of it.

Anyway, this brings us to December. There’re a couple of posts I want to do this month in addition to reviews, which hopefully I’ll get around to in-between my chaotic work schedule. One is that I’m declaring next year a reread year, where I’ll reread some of my favorite books and see if they live up to my memory of them. I’d been kicking around the idea for a while now, but really focused on it after a comment by Piotrek over on Re-Enchantment. Now all I need is some cool artwork and an even cooler name for it. Which… doesn’t seem too likely, but hey—could happen.

Yeah so, let’s get this year over with!

Book Loot – November Edition

A very light haul this month, but I need it to catch up on everything I fell behind on in the early fall. Chance that that happens? I’m going with… low, but possible. If nothing else, I shouldn’t fall further behind. Life continues to be just… exhausting this year, y’know? We’re almost done with 2020 (though my brain assures me that reaching an arbitrary “end” to the year won’t do any good or change anything—my mind is always optimistic and super helpful)—just a couple more months to go!

ARCs

The Rush’s Edge – by Ginger Smith (11/10)

Hal Cullen is an ex-supersoldier, grown in a vat and guaranteed little in the way of a life outside of war. Burned out and not long for life, Hal reluctantly takes a job salvaging ships to pass the time before his inevitable crash. But as he begins to grow close to a new crewmember, Hal starts to imagine a life outside of his vat-given one. And that’s when an alien presence takes over their ship and SHTF. Many thanks to Angry Robot (#TheRushsEdge, #AngryRobot) for the ARC!

Infernal – by Mark de Jager (Re-release • 11/26)

Stratus wakes in an unfamiliar place, with no memory of anything before but for the fact that he is not human. He does possess an incredible strength and the overwhelming will to survive. As he sets out across the war-torn land, Stratus will discover bits and pieces of his life before, all culminating in the burning desire for vengeance upon those that robbed him of his past. Many thanks to Rebellion for this reissue! It looks really good!

Purchases

Forest of Souls – by Lori M. Lee

My monthly audiobook credit went to the newest Lori M. Lee book that I’ve been planning on reading for half the year. I still have a bit of listening burnout, but we’ll see how it goes. With the power to cheat death, an army of living trees, and promised doses of action, heartache and intrigue, hopefully it’ll prove more than entertaining!

What are everyone’s plans for November? Anybody doing Nanowrimo, maybe shopping their memoirs, or bedding down for the remainder of the year (I know Tammy’s husband has something planned!)? I’ll admit, I’m tempted on that final one! And not only since it’s supposed to be -10˚F this week (that’s -23˚C just in case you were curious), and we’re supposed to get a foot of snow.

Book Loot – October Edition

I was a little late on the draw this month, but we got the October edition out as the month starts, so I’m counting that as a win. All been a bit sideways lately, which I’ll brief later, but right now let’s get into it!

ARCs

The Midnight Circus – by Jane Yolen (10/01)

Welcome to the Midnight Circus: the collected works of Jane Yolen combining the wicked, haunting, solemn and unbelievable all into one volume in which the Circus lurks in every plot or poem. Or so I’ve been told. Thanks to Tachyon and NetGalley for the eARC!

Once and Future Witches – by Alix E. Harrow (10/13)

As of 1893, witches are no more. And the modern woman finds nothing more scandalous to pursue than suffrage. When two sisters join the movement in New Salem, they bring to it old ideas and even older magics. But when hunted by forces that will not suffer a witch to live, they must delve into blacker arts still. And though 1893 knows no witches—it soon will. Many thanks to Redhook and Orbit for the eARC!

Phoenix Extravagant – by Yoon Ha Lee (10/20)

For generations, the Empire has spread across the world. Reliant on automata animated by powerful magical sigils and paints, it is a nigh unstoppable force. But when one of the magic painters sets out to discover the source of the Phoenix Extravagant, what they uncover will prove beyond their wildest dreams. Thanks to Solaris for the ARC!

The Tower of Fools – by Andrjez Sapkowski (Re-release • 10/27)

Reinmar must flee after being caught in bed with a knight’s wife. Pursued not only by the knight and his brother but also the Inquisition, Reinmar takes refuge in the Tower of Fools, an asylum for the insane. Many thanks to Gollancz and NetGalley for the eARC!

The Subjugate & The Sensation – by Amanda Bridgeman (10/13)

Welcome to the world of Salvi Brentt, a homicide detective that walks the beat between augmented killers and religious fanatics. A cyberpunk murder-mystery, I was sold on this as a concept right after I heard about it and can’t wait to dig in. Many thanks to Angry Robot for the ARC of the Sensation, as well as the inclusion of the Subjugate, the first in Brentt’s investigations.

Purchases

The Jade City – by Fonda Lee

The island of Kekon is the world’s only source of magical jade, able to imbue its few recipients with superhuman abilities. The Kaul Family makes up half of the two crime syndicates that lay claim to the isle, but when their rivals instigate a brutal clan war, the streets that were paved with green may instead turn red with blood.

The Black Company – by Glen Cook

The Black Company take their pay from the Lady, careful not to ask too many questions. But when prophecy arises, nothing will keep the mercs from pursuing it. Not the Lady, and not even their own doubts.

Life

I’ve fallen behind lately as work is in full swing and with the fall harvests and hunting season, I’m just not reading as much lately. Don’t have much free time for it. So I dunno how many of these ARCs I’ll get through this month, especially since I have to make up a few from September and the months prior. At the moment though, I still have November off, so maybe I’ll have time to catch up. Yeah… maaaybe.

So what’s been going on with y’all lately? Have you seen or read any of these, or do you want to? Be sure and let me know!

Book Loot – September Edition

Not a huge haul this month, but maybe it’ll give me an opportunity to catch up on some ARCs I’ve missed, maybe read some more of the Yarnsworld books or some stuff off my 2020 TBR. Or maybe there’ll be a late addition or two from my outstanding requests (I can hope—and there even was one last month). Oh, that and Fable, by Adrienne Young, (which comes out September 1th) which I’ve been looking forward to but got rejected every time I tried to beg for a copy. No matter.

ARCs

The Awkward Black Man – by Walter Mosley (US • 9/15) (UK • 10/1)

A collection of stories from amazing author Walter Mosley. I’m cautiously optimistic, as I’ve enjoyed his mystery fiction, but hated his science fiction. This is one author my Dad introduced me to, so even if I don’t like the stories, maybe he will. The good thing about an omnibus collection is that even if you don’t like one, maybe you’ll like another. Thanks to Grove Press for the eARC!

The Seventh Perfection – by Daniel Polansky (9/22)

An amanuensis (essentially a secretary-slave) of the God-King sets out to unravel one riddle central to the core of his reign. If she somehow completes her work, all of his rule might fall. But as she has achieved all Seven Perfections in order to become the God-King’s servant, it begs the question—can anyone really stop her? Much thanks to Tor for the copy! (Hopefully this means they’re warming up to me.)

The Kraken’s Tooth – by Anthony Ryan (9/30)

The Pilgrim and Seeker return in this sequel to A Pilgrimage of Swords, where the Pilgrim now seeks to claim a mythical blade for… some reason. I found the first entry unexpectedly entertaining, so my hopes are a bit higher for this second one. Many thanks to Subterranean Press for the ebook!

Bystander 27 – by Rik Hoskin

Some kind of vigilante meets Punisher is what sold me. When ex-Seal Jon Hayes’ wife is killed in a clash between two costumed super-“heroes” (well, one hero and one villain), he must step out of the shadows to get the vengeance he craves.

My first physical ARC! The first thing I did when I got it was text my family and friends—none of which responded with any kind of joy or excitement whatsoever. But I was still excited. Even though it’s already come out; I missed the period where I should’ve read it on NetGalley, so am stoked to get a second chance at it! Big thanks to Angry Robot for the copy!

Purchases

Havenfall – by Sarah Holland

I actually used my audio credit this month, on a YA I’ve been meaning to read. For Maddie, summers at the Inn at Havenfall are her only escape from the nightmare that is her regular life. Located at the crossroads of worlds, the Inn is a refuge for those that would seek to protect the world, and even those who seek to destroy it. But when the truce of the Inn is broken, Maddie must rush to restore the peace before war breaks out. And she must do it all while somehow convincing her uncle to keep her on after the summer. That is—if there’s an Inn to return to. Actually not bad so far, the YA romance isn’t very cringe-worthy even.

To Dream and Die as a Taniwha Girl – by Benedict Patrick

The final delivery from his Kickstarter back in June, Taniwha Girl is essentially the sequel to Benedict Patrick’s Where the Waters Turn Black. While I haven’t gotten to it yet, as previously mentioned, I hope this is the month I get to do a deep dive into Yarnsworld. While his debut was a bit of a mixed bag for me, I hope that this is one of those worlds that gets better with time and experience.

Life

So, work is starting back up here soon, which is nice. Though there’re a lot of new COVID rules which are just going to be a pain. Well, enforcing them is at least. But I know that it’s important, and that all the rules have been explained to the parents already, so that most of the hoaxers have been weeded out already (and yeah, there were a fair amount, actually). Thing is, I found that all my winter programs have been canceled, along with my part-timer, so I need to find something else after October. Which sucks, but oh well.

I also have some medical appointments and procedures (nothing too serious, mind) in early September, so I may just be MIA for a week or so around that time. Or I might just miss a week do to incurable lethargy, who knows?

Book Loot – June Edition

So, June was a fun month, eh? I know, I know—and it isn’t even over yet. With my illness and the lack of work, and the lack of new jobs (especially those who want to hire people with COVIDish symptoms), I think I drove maybe twice this month. Both times to go to the doctor. So… fun! Well, there’re plenty of amazing books to look forward to this summer, many of them in July. Here are but the few I’ve been granted access to:

ARCs for July

The Constant Rabbit – by Jasper Fforde (7/02 – UK • 9/29 US)

The Constant Rabbit is a Jasper Fforde book, which means it’s probably gonna be weird (update: it sure is!). 50 years before the start of the novel—in an event known only as “The Event”—18 rabbits were anthropomorphized. Since then, their numbers have exploded in the UK alone, and the relations between the two have gotten strained to a tipping point. For though the Rabbit has proven to be a patient, peaceful people—will it continue?

Pretty good so far, btw! I enjoyed my last Fforde (Early Riser) novel right up until the end, and hopefully the Constant Rabbit will be no different. Or better—hopefully it’ll be even better!

Every Sky a Grave – by Jay Posey (7/07)

A brand new space opera from the creator of the Duskwalker saga, Every Sky a Grave centers around the planetary assassin Elyth. Privy to the mysterious Language of the Universe, she and her order have the means to doom and destroy worlds with but a few words and a touch. But when a new power emerges using the Language in previously unheard-of ways, Elyth and her order are in for the fight of their lives. Because no one likes competition.

Red Noise – by John P. Murphy (7/14)

All the Miner wanted was to offload her haul, load up on supplies, and return to her claim in peace. But after stopping in at Station 35, she becomes embroiled in a turf war between two rival gangs and the corrupt head of security. With no supplies, no coin, and no other options, the Miner decides to join up and make some quick and easy blood money. But why pick just one side when she can play them all?

I’d heard some disagreement among reviewers who got to this before I did, but personally I quite liked it! The story reminds me of anime with a western vibe and provides enough action and stealth that I couldn’t help but fall in. Review should be up on Tuesday!

When Jackals Storm the Walls – by Bradley P. Beaulieu (7/14 US • 7/23 UK)

The penultimate Shattered Sands features a Shangazi much changed. The rule of the Kings in Sharakai has ended—blood mage Queen Meryam now rules the city in their stead. Out in the desert, tensions have finally boiled over. Relationships have crumbled and hate grown in their place. How Emre, Davud, Brama and Ihsan handle these is sure to shape the world, should each survive long enough to see it through. Elsewhere, Nalamae has been killed by her siblings, prompting her cycle of rebirth to renew itself. Though Çeda scours the desert for the goddess, her search will eventually lead her to Sharakai where she is faced with an impossible choice: will she join forces with the treacherous Kings, or risk the city’s destruction? Whatever she decides is sure to have consequences, and ooooh I can’t wait to read this one!

Ashes of the Sun – by Django Wexler (7/21)

Long ago, a war leveled an empire. A new one regrew in its place, but old tensions still simmer. And now a new war looms. Gyre hunts for a legendary artifact that may yet save his people, with the power to destroy the Twilight Order. But while searching the mysterious ruins he comes upon something unexpected. His sister. The same sister his parents sold a decade past to the Order. But she is not the kin he remembers, and nothing—not even blood—will stop the two from rending the world in twain.

Automatic Reload – by Ferrett Steinmetz (7/28)

A rollicking cyberpunk thriller about two supersoldiers with panic disorders, PTSD, and crippling anxiety. When Mat takes a job transporting cargo for the mysterious IAC, he inadvertently discovers the cargo isn’t a package at all. It’s a woman. Sylvia has been transformed almost beyond recognition. Augmented with radically experimental hardware, she’s been transformed (against her will) into the pinnacle of stealth assassins. And she can’t handle it. When Mat decides to free her, the two become the poster children of Enemy of the State, and there’s no Gene Hackman around to help them out. If they want to live long enough to rescue Sylvia’s family from the IAC, they have to learn to work together. But the chemistry that follows may catch them both off-guard.

Review to come on this one too, but I personally LOVED IT. So, start anticipating it now, yeah?

Purchases

I backed Benedict Patrick’s Kickstarter, and got the promise of some loot in the future, but nothing right now. Bit of a gamble for me, to be honest. If you’re interested, check it out. If not, don’t.

A late addition here was the only book I bought this month. And I didn’t expect it so quickly! I could post a blurb, but the picture’s really worth the most words here.

As I have not been granted (yet, at least) Peace Talks, you can go ahead and anticipate that next month. Because I am totally buying that book. But first, some Murderbot.

Gifts & Freebies

Minor Mage – by T. Kingfisher

A birthday present from my sister, regarding Oliver—a very minor mage. Armed with an armadillo familiar, three spells (one to control his allergies to armadillos), and little enough magic to place himself firmly on Rincewind’s level, he’s pretty much worthless as a mage. Unfortunately, he’s all there is.

And They Were Never Heard From Again – by Benedict Patrick

An intro faerie tale to Benedict Patrick’s Yarnsworld series, this free novella features a forest full of monsters, a town whose citizens lock themselves in the cellar at night, and two brothers caught far from home when the sun goes down.

I’ve actually reviewed this—here—already. An entertaining, if ultimately disappointing read. The world, however, drank me in so much that I can’t wait to return to it! September can’t come fast enough!

Games

The Long Dark (PS4)

The most recent update kept crashing my computer, so I was forced to make a choice. Did I buy the console version, or—I bought the console version. Bummed that I had to pay for the damned thing twice, but Hinterland’s really made a good survival game here, and I suppose I’m happy enough to support them. Still rankles a bit, though. Like half the gaming world, I eagerly await the Last of Us II, so I’m sure a replay of #1 will warrant itself in the near future.

Afterword

I’m slowly getting better from the respiratory infection that’s been plaguing me for months. It’s going to be a long, hard way back, especially with all the muscle I’ve dropped in the past 6 months, and especially with backpacking season looming. All my friends have pulled out of the would-be trip this year, so I’m planning on Lone Wolfing it. Which is equal parts invigorating and terrifying. Luckily, there’s a trail I’ve always wanted to pack about half an hour away, and I’ve never seen anyone on it. It’s a bit long (like, 12 miles in) though, so we’ll see how it goes. I just need to feel better, and it needs to stop snowing, eh (snowed on Monday, fyi). But first, there’s a wedding or two, a lot to read, and an illness to conquer. I hope y’all are having a… as good a year as can be expected! Anticipating these or any other books in July? Anything else on your reading list for the month? Anything I need to check out? Any exciting summer plans? Let me know, please. Otherwise—stay safe and be well!

I’ve been watching ‘Hate Thy Neighbor’ and… people are lovely. Just… really. Racism, sexism, and bigotry abound, and can be based on upbringing, environment, society, even losing out on a job, and so much more. In my opinion, people are allowed to believe what they want, as well as to express their own opinions. That said… there’s no need to just spew hate around. Oh, and that even though you might think the COVID threat has ended, it’s not something you can just wish away. So please try to keep socially distant, wear a mask, be careful, and don’t be a dick. Seriously, don’t be a dick.