On Tap 11/14

Currently Reading

• After Atlas – by Emma Newman

The second in the series from Planetfall author Emma Newman, I’ve heard that this is better than the original, which is good, as the entire thing was overshadowed by the trainwreck of an ending. But the first book is also what haunts our lead, Detective Carlos Moreno. But when a murder forces Moreno to confront the demons of his past, it also forces him to dig deeper into the departure of Atlas—more deeply than he ever wanted.

• Phoenix Extravagant – by Yoon Ha Lee

Ah, one of the backlog of ARCs that somehow I missed. While not exactly science fiction, it’s not exactly NOT science fiction. I mean, there are automatons. Dragons. A government coverup. And… magic paint? Anyway, just started this, so no insights yet, but I’m optimistic!

Up Next

• Salvation – by Peter F. Hamilton

What will be my 3rd Hamilton novel, Salvation features an entire galaxy ripe for the taking, and a colonization of planets stretching unchecked across the stars. Unchecked, that is, until a mysterious disaster that hints of a threat mankind might have somehow overlooked. A menace that might just prove their downfall.

Other Stuff

I actually have a science fiction review coming out tomorrow, so there’s that. There’s some political stuff going on, which I’m going to avoid talking about… past saying that this election is indicative as to why the two-party system really doesn’t work. And why we need to take third parties more seriously. And that’s it for that.

Almost have finished Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning. I’m maybe 80 hours in, almost done with the main story, still glut with side quests, and I’m only now starting to get sick of it. I’d certainly recommend it, if you’re looking for a good game on the cheap (I’ve been playing the PS3 version) or you could try the re-release for the current systems.

COVID continues to ravage the Mountain West states, as Montana has been posting around 1000 new cases a day for the past two weeks! Yesterday we just posted a record 1214 new cases. This week at least 30 of the 50 people I worked with tested positive. Considering we’ve a population of barely a million, this is staggering. And while a fair amount of people are crying panic, it seems more (around here) are just content to ignore it. Putting aside every political belief for a second, I just can’t believe this is happening. Not only here, but around the country. I… I can’t even think of what to say about it.

My anxiety has been crazy lately. With everything that’s going on, I just want to lock my doors and hide in the corner. I haven’t been sleeping well or getting much reading done. I’m firmly in the camp that we all need to hide in doors and go out as little as possible, but the incoming administration in my state vehemently disagrees. So… I’ll power through—at least for now—but something has to change. Soon.

Hope the rest of y’all are keeping safe! And for my international friends and followers: I love you guys, please don’t come visit. It sucks here.

On Tap 9/7

Currently Reading

Havenfall – by Sarah Holland

An interesting YA Fantasy regarding the crossroads of multiple worlds located in Colorado, which for some confusing reason doesn’t involve a stargate. The romance isn’t actually terrible, and the story is unique enough to me that I’m having no trouble reading it.

Bystander 27 – by Rik Hoskin

Like a mashup of the Reckoners and the Punisher. It reads a bit like a Peter Clines novel, albeit with some very dated language. And some serious repetition issues. But with an interesting mystery and an action-packed plot, it’s definitely entertaining!

Night Sky – by Robert Harvey

A lovely, LOVELY book about bits of the universe that you can see with your naked eye. While I have an ARC of the upcoming ebook version, now I totally want a hardcover of this! It has many, many BEAUTIFUL photos! I’m already recommending checking this out, if you like scifi or astronomy. Or just beautiful pictures.

Up Next

Seventh Perfection – by Daniel Polansky

A secret behind the God-King’s reign may unravel everything. But only those having completed the final perfection are privy to the secret, those closest and most dedicated to the God-King’s rule. I’m more than ready to get into this one!

Upcoming Reviews

These will all have reviews, I promise. Ish. I promise-ish.

Crownbreaker (that’s tomorrow!) was incredible, ditto with Network Effect, so just go read both of them! There we go, problem solved.

Also, I’ve been watching Let’s Plays of Tell Me Why, since I don’t have a XBox and WHY DON’T I HAVE AN XBOX I WANT TO PLAY THIS GAME NOW. Everyone have a good week!

TBR – August

Currently Reading

Magebane – by Stephen Aryan (Age of Dread #3)

Magic is bad. That’s pretty much the tune of this series, if you haven’t been keeping up. The Age of Dread trilogy comes at the end of the Age of Darkness one, so essentially we’ve had six books leading up to this point. I have to give it too Steven Aryan—this one’s been hella entertaining and I can’t wait to see how it all comes out. This may not be grimdark, but it’s certainly more than a bit dark, and definitely a good enough series for me to recommend.

Top TBR for August

At the moment, Crownbreaker will be the next physical book on my plate, as finishing up series is starting to be a priority for me. I’ll definitely miss Kellen and Reichis, but if there’s ever a pair that could use an ending—happy or otherwise—it’s these two. Now, I had to stop Vengeful when my library loan kinda broke, so Havenfall looks like my next audiobook. I’m hoping this YA adventure will prove an interesting diversion from life (somewhat realistic as I’ve heard, but not much). Another series summary is Where Gods Fear to Go by Angus Watson, which features such lures as telekinetic sasquatch, annoying but entertaining Vikings, and well, other things. I’ve enjoyed the series thus far, and am certainly looking forward to the conclusion. I could probably put Blood of Empire on every single TBR for the year as I’m both excited to read it and frustrated that I haven’t gotten to it yet. The Autumn Republic is one of my favorite books ever, so I’m hoping that BoE will live up to its unreasonable standards.

TBR Finished Since Last

They Mostly Come Out at Night – by Benedict Patrick (Yarnsworld #1)

Age of Empyre – by Michael J. Sullivan (Legends of the First Empire #6)

• Network Effect – by Martha Wells (Murderbot Chronicles #5)

Of the three books I’ve finished off my TBR in the last month, Age of Empyre was the one that felt most satisfying. Though I probably enjoyed Network Effect more, there was just something about finishing off a series—especially one that spanned six books—that felt more special than continuing one other and starting a third. I start a heck of a lot more series than I ever finish, so when I’m able to go beginning to end on something that entertains me throughout, it’s quite the feeling of accomplishment. While there were some ups and downs, the Legends of the First Empire had a lasting appeal to see me through to the end, along with enough twists and turns to keep me guessing. Unrelated: If you’re wondering where my thoughts on Network Effect are, I um, haven’t gotten to them yet. It was good, though. That enough?

In other news, my gaming burnout continues, as I’ve unsuccessfully chucked a bunch of titles at it without anything sticking. I’m also sleeping a lot. Like, 10 hours a day a lot. Now, most people might have a problem with wasting their lives or something, but sleep is elusive enough for me that I don’t mind it at all. In fact, if I had another hour in the day, I’d probably try to spend it asleep. Plus with work (supposedly) starting again soon, I’m sure I’ll be losing it sooner or later.

Read anything off this month’s TBR? Thoughts, opinions, complaints? Anyone like sleep as much as I do? Hope y’all are doing well!

On Tap 8/09

I’m not even going to talk about the world right now. It’s still there. And full of people. Anyhow, reading:

Currently Reading

• Vengeful – by V.E. Schwab

Sequel to Vicious regards individuals that escaped death, but came back changed; extraordinary. Just not necessarily good. Jeremy Arthur is doing his best to bring this to life thus far, though the ultimate plot has yet to evolve. Unless it’s just wossname dying—in which case… meh.

• Every Sky a Grave – by Jay Posey

Planetary assassins wielding ancient power take center stage in this universe-spanning space-opera. Just getting back into it after a month away.

Up Next

• Havenfall – by Sara Holland

An Inn at the crossroads of four realms and a girl sworn to protect it. But when a dead body is found, Maddie must solve the mystery of the death before the peace is broken.

Gaming

• No Man’s Sky

Yeah, I waited for a bunch of the free updates before trying this. I’m hoping it’ll prove more of a successor to one of my all-time favs, EV Nova. So far, there’s a lot of exploration, a lot of crafting, but not much of any kind of guidance, like a plot. Not that it’s bad, but… am I missing something?

On Tap 7/17

Currently Reading

• The God Game – by Danny Tobey

Who suggested this? Whomever it was, I hate them. Because, I mean… I do need to sleep, you know? And this book seriously isn’t helping. For what G.O.D. wants, G.O.D. gets. And if it doesn’t, you might just find yourself losing. And if you lose in the game, you lose in life. And you lose YOUR life.

• They Mostly Come Out at Night – by Benedict Patrick

Just started this. Read it before—a while ago. Remembered I liked it, but. Can’t remember what the “but” was. Lonan hides in his cellar at night, safely beyond the reach of the darkness. But in his dreams he’s a prince, one whose world is slowly being taken from him. When the dreams turn prophetic, Lonan must regain the trust of his village or risk his dreams coming true.

• The Hidden Life of Ice – by Marco Tedesco

So far this is a huge disappointment. I’ve always liked ice, especially blue ice, and been fascinated glaciers and by places like Greenland. So far—about halfway through (a book that’s maybe 150 pages)—there’s been nothing about ice. I mean, nothing. This is why I don’t read non-fiction. Seriously.

Up Next

• Every Sky a Grave – by Jay Posey

I had to stop reading this to read Constant Rabbit earlier in the summer, and never got back to it. That needs to change. A planetary assassin wielding the Language of the Universe comes across an unknown power using the same power at far greater efficiency—but is it good, or evil? And no matter what it is—is there any way to stop it?

• Network Effect – by Martha Wells

So, I’ve had Network Effect for almost a month but haven’t read it yet. Yeah, I’ve been busy with a lot of fancy and amazing ARCs, but still. I mean… Murderbot. That should say it all. I honestly can’t remember the blurb for this, but it’s probably “something something Murderbot something awesome something epic.” And now I really want to read it.

TBR – June 2020

My ability to read and/or finish a book (ANY book) has been all over the map lately. This, combined with the release schedule for books in July—including titles I haven’t gotten to like Peace Talks, When Jackals Storm the Walls, and Every Sky a Grave—and current ARCs that are already overdue for reviews—like Shorefall, Highfire, or the Kingdom of Liars—means that I’ve no clue what I’ll been reading moving forward. Even like, into next week. Therefore, I’m just going to list a few books that I have and I most feel like reading as of right now.

Currently Reading

• The Tattered Banner – by Duncan M. Hamilton

Progress on the Tattered Banner has stalled, as I find my attention wandering yet again. The story, following Soren on his life as a waif-turned-academy swordsman, has been a bit dry up to this point, and a little detached and impersonal. I’m about 1/3 through, where he leaves school for a bit to go adventuring, and where I hope the story will pick up. But we shall see.

So, first of all, I realize Blood of Empire isn’t on here. And I don’t know what to tell you. I just haven’t been able to get past Chapter 3. And it’s not because the writing is bad, or the story is bad, or… anything else that I can think of. I think I’m anticipating it too much. And I want it to be perfect. And that pressure plus the added pressure I’m feeling from the world right now is proving too much for me. Or whatever.

Where Gods Fear to Go chronicles the continuing adventures of Finnbogi and his companions across pseudo-America toward the Meadows. Though it hasn’t been perfect, this quest has been immensely entertaining, with the final leg of the journey involving peril, pitfalls, and telekinetic sasquatches.

Crownbreaker wraps up the adventures of Kellen, the wandering Jan’Tep turned Argosi spellslinger, who has recently found a home advising a Daroman queen. Though Kellen’s life has already been fraught with challenge, this final entry in the series promises to up the ante, with the outcast returning home to deal with his father, his sister, and the upstart and power-hungry empire he thought he’d left behind for good. I’ve absolutely no idea which direction this is going to go and I can’t sell it enough. That said, I am a bit disappointed as I’ve enjoyed this series so much. The end—whatever it brings—is sure to be bittersweet.

Remember back in January when I wrote the review for Herald of the Storm and wanted desperately to return to the world of Steelhaven? That seems so loooong ago now. I mean… a long, long while. And I still haven’t read this. I recently (like, in March) discovered that River is absent from the Shattered Crown, which soured me a bit on it, but I still do need to make it back. It’s only book #2, after all.

The House of Shattered Wings is a murder mystery set in Paris, featuring the fallout of a heavenly war and its both immortal and mortal survivors. I’d misplaced this for a while but—despite not receiving the greatest reviews—still would like to read it. Why not now, when this corner of the world is currently going to pieces? Perfect time, seems.

Age of Empyre represents the latest MJS series to conclude and, while I was certainly not enamored with the first three books, it’s been night-and-day with the previous two. Since both #4 & #5 have ended in cliffhangers, I assume that Empyre will represent a suitably epic conclusion—one that I cannot wait to experience for myself.

I’ve been waiting on After Atlas for when I’m also working on a fantasy adventure, so the two might balance one another out, but as I’ve been playing the Last of Us in my spare time (I’m working on a final run of the first one before I start part deus) I haven’t gotten around to it yet. But I shall. Probably soon. Ish.

I’ve finished one (ONE) physical, like, made-of-paper book since April 7th. Considering I usually have a rotation of three going (one physical, one audio, one ebook) at one time, this has cut into my reading somewhat. Furthermore, considering that most of my TBR titles are physical books, this has somewhat impeded my progress on my list for the year. But… well, what can you do? So we journey onward.

TBR Read Since April

Since I did something different in May, this represents the TBR I finished in the last two months. Four titles—not bad. But only one off my 2020 list, which we are at 6/18 through, which… ain’t too shabby, tbh. I figured 10 would be a good number to shoot for for the year, and halfway through the year (yes, the year’s only halfway done) I’m already over half done (but only 1/3 to ticking them all off).

Read any of these? Any I need to add/skip? Anything else happening? I know this month’s TBR is a bit late, but I was mostly busy not reading things on it lately.

(Also, adding that last group of 4 images took 6 tries, which is ridiculous, since they were already in my library)

Update – Currently Reading

So since yesterday, I started a new book. It started with an email I received from the publisher, asking how I’d liked the read, and imploring me to get my review for it in. I’ve nothing against the asking, but this caught me off guard. See, the book in question had been delayed in the US til late September. So I’ve put it off a bit as my July is littered with new releases, and I’m not a very fast reader. But I overlooked two important details. One—I didn’t check to see if it was delayed in Europe as well and—two—I’d forgotten just who granted me the review copy. I don’t get many books off Netgalley UK, but this one I did. And it’s still due out July 2 there. So I’ve shuffled a few things, and begun reading:

• The Constant Rabbit – by Jasper Fforde

If you’ve never read a Jasper Fforde book, let me tell you—they’re odd. Like, really weird. The first chapter of this involved some game called ‘Competitive Librarying’ which confused me so thoroughly that I actually just skipped the chapter. But thankfully, it appears to be just an intro hook. Albeit a massively confounding one. The Constant Rabbit is based on something that has occurred in the UK some 50 years prior, known only as “The Event”, in which 18 rabbits were anthropomorphized. Since then, there are millions of them in the UK alone, and relations between them and humans are… strained. The story seems to center on this point.

It’s okay thus far—weird, which is normal for Fforde—but it’s really coming out at a poor time. I cringe at the idea that someone’s going to compare this with the Black Lives Matter movement, because it WILL happen eventually, and it’s sure to be really insulting. Which is disappointing, as the book is most likely designed to keep you entertained, make you think, and provide some humor.

On Tap 6/16

Currently Reading

• The Tattered Banner – by Duncan M. Hamilton

Something off my TBR for a while now, you may remember I picked up the trilogy on audio a month or two back. I’ve been reading it while playing the Long Dark, so it’s been entertaining enough. It’s… okay, so far, but shows that it’s the author’s debut book. Soren is a good character to read along to—picked up off the street, enrolled and sponsored in a sword academy, he learns it’s what he’s been seeking all along—but the story is a bit dry thus far. Let’s hope that changes, eh?

• Every Sky a Grave – by Jay Posey

Another scifi book hot on the heels of Red Noise. I LOVED Jay Posey’s Duskwalker series, but never got around to his Outrider ones. If Every Sky a Grave proves good, I may just have to remedy this. Elyth is a planetary assassin that wields the mystical Language of the Universe, to do strange and impossible things. But when another power emerges, manipulating this Language in ways Elyth has never conceived, it will be up to her to… change that? The blurb wasn’t super descriptive, and I’m just starting out. Stay tuned!

• The Poacher’s Son – by Paul Doiron

Well, my dad has me reading one of his mystery/thrillers. Centered around Maine game warden Mike Bowditch, this is the start of what’s now an 11 book series. So far, not bad, though a little cliché. Like the character enough, however, and hope it continues to be alright. My dad and I don’t exactly share a taste in books, but he’s been reading a lot of my fantasy ones lately, so I figured I’d humor him.

Up Next

• After Atlas – by Emma Newman

Considering that June is scifi month (what—November? Noo~) We’ll be continuing on later with this follow-up to Planetfall, which I was rather torn on (the ending, the ending sucked). Luckily (and also unluckily) this takes an entirely new direction, delving into the state of the Earth after the ship Atlas left. It’s one of my Top 2020 TBRs so I hope it’s entertaining!

• In the Village Where the Brightwine Flows – by Bradley P. Beaulieu

A novella following Dardzada, whose cruel half-brother enlists him to help discern what’s happening to the city’s street urchins. I’m not sure, but I imagine it probably snowballs. With When Jackals Storm the Walls coming out in mid-July, I figured this reminder of the Shattered Sands might help me get back into the world with a little brush-up.

Life

So the world continues to spiral. I won’t address it, but y’all know what side I’m on. I swear, it seems we as a people and we as a planet just cannot get along. On a personal note, I’m still sick. Not sure what I have exactly, but it’s COVID-like, without being COVID. Pretty much I’m short of breath, fatigued and feel weak all the time. Plus I haven’t been sleeping (the breathing makes it hard), so that’s super helpful. And I might be out of a job. Haven’t heard from my boss in a while, despite my attempts. But they haven’t resumed work yet, so hopefully I’m just overreacting. All I know is that no one wants to hire someone with COVID-y symptoms, and I don’t have the energy to do much anyway. So… yeah. Awesome. Otherwise I’ve been playing the Long Dark—though I had to buy it on console (at full price even!), since the newest update kept crashing on my computer and I really love that dang game. But at least the new lack of trophies gives me something to do.

Hope y’all are doing better than I—it’s been a year, and it ain’t even half over yet. Which is… just great. Can’t wait for the election; I’m sure that’ll unite the country. Anyway, has anyone read any of these? Good, bad, ugly—let me know! Or just let me know how you’re doing, what’s up, or if you want to talk about anything else.

Oh, and my sister is posting some Dancougar stuff, to see if she wants to start an anime blog. I’ve never seen the show, but I’ve heard it’s solid. Go check it out?

On Tap 5/30

Currently Reading

• To Be Taught, If Fortunate – by Becky Chambers

If some scifi stories are more fiction than science, To Be Taught, If Fortunate is probably more science than… well, a comparable amount of both science and fiction. An group of explorers travel somewhere no ‘man has ever been: an extrasolar system. What they find here is beyond their wildest dreams, but it’s what they left behind that may provide the biggest surprise at all. For what are people if not curious, and what would happen should that curiosity fade?

• The Bayern Agenda – by Dan Moren

The Bayern Agenda is the second Galactic Cold War book, and the first through Angry Robot who kindly sent me a copy. At about the quarter mark right now and it reads like a pretty standard military scifi thriller, but there’s still a ways to go.

• Eden – by Tim Lebbon

Eden is an eco-supernatural thriller about a future where the world has succumbed to climate change and global warming. In a last-ditch effort to combat this, the world established several Virigin Zones that were returned to nature. Jenn and her father are part of a team that race across these wildernesses, but this time they might’ve gone too far. Eden is the oldest and wildest of the Zones, and who knows what may lurk within?

• People of the Rainforest – by John Hemming

People of the Rainforest is my lone nonfiction read of the year, regarding the Villas Boas brothers and their exploration of the Amazon jungle basin. As with all nonfiction titles, this one boasts an incredibly long name, which I neither can remember nor repeat.

Up Next

• Age of Empyre – by Michael J. Sullivan

The sixth and final book in the Legends of the First Empire series, now we find out what two consecutive cliffhangers have set in motion. And whether or not Suri is the Heir of Novron. Or… right?

It’s been a scifi heavy month for me. Which is a wee bit odd, as I think it’s fantasy month everywhere else. But sometimes that’s how things go.

Obviously the world’s still not in its best place, but that seems the norm nowadays, sadly. Hopefully we get it together here soon. Otherwise, my little corner of nowhere’s been pretty quiet. Still sick, but it ain’t COVID, so that’s good. But it’s been stirring up lately with my allergies and my anxiety and reflux and everything, so it’s been tough to figure what I have, exactly. But it’ll get better. Anyway what’s everyone else reading? Anything I need to get to? Let me know!

Book Loot – May Edition

After I stockpiled a bunch of books last month to see me through this new illness and my social distancing plans this summer (it’s not really a COVID thing, I’m introverted every summer) (most of the year, actually), this month I really didn’t get much. Didn’t buy a single book, even. While I didn’t get a lot of book loot, I DO go on a rant about one of the games I got this month. So, that’s mildly interesting.

ARCs for June

By Force Alone – by Lavie Tidhar (6/16)

Ye gods this book. A grimdark retelling of the Arthurian legend, it’s definitely nailed the darkness. TBH I hate every character in this book. That I’ve read so far, at least. And there haven’t been that many, as I can’t get into it. It’s just… bad. I’ve tried four separate times and haven’t yet surpassed 10%. It’s certainly looking like a DNF at this point. Although I don’t usually review DNFs on here, I’ll do a group DNF here sometime soon, but maybe check out Rebecca’s over at Powder & Page in the meantime? It’s only slightly more flattering than mine will be.

The Adventures of Rockford T. Honeypot – by Josh Gottsegen (6/23)

As a young chipmunk, shy, bookish Rockford T. Honeypot had dreams of thrilling adventures across the forest. However, timid of danger and germs, his only adventures were found in books and his imagination. When his family abandons him after a mistake that destroys their hazelnut business, Rockford sets off on a legendary journey beyond his wildest dreams.

Honestly, it sounds like some kind of reluctant adventurer meets Redwall scenario. A middle-grade book, I’ll probably start it after I finish (or bin) By Force Alone.

The Kingdom of Liars – by Nick Martell (6/23)

Originally scheduled for release on May 5th, it’s been pushed back, which gives me more time to read it! I actually only snagged a copy after hearing some friends‘ reviews, which was lucky enough considering it should’ve been published before I had a chance. Years earlier, Michael was accused of murdering the king’s only son. By his own father. Branded a traitor and cast out of society, now he robs the rich, but is desperate for a way to reclaim his old life. In a world where magic costs memories, Michael must survive a civil war between magic and technology, with a family dictatorship standing atop the throne.

Purchases

None!

Games

AC: Syndicate

After I sank nearly 130 hours into AC: Odyssey, I figured I’d go back in time a little. Turns out Syndicate was on sale this month so I got it for $9. Woot! I’ve always wanted to play it, so everything works out.

The Sinking City (aka: the rant)

A title from Sherlock Holmes publisher Frogwares, the Sinking City is a Lovecraftian horror game revolving around war vet and gumshoe Charles W. Reed. Now, I’d been after this one for a while. I almost got it when it came out, but the price was a bit steep. Finally found it on sale this month and… I’m still a little disappointed. I’d heard it wasn’t great, so my expectations weren’t high. So, good news first: The detective aspects are its best feature. There’s no handholding, no line that you can follow around that shows you exactly where to go and who to talk to and what to look for. There are hints—but they’re few and far between. This is mostly rewarding, but sometimes irritating as heck. For better or worse, it’s up to you to solve the crimes, and rely on your own thought-process to do so.

Now the bad news. First off, the game plays like a PS3 version ported to a PS4. It lags a fair amount, especially between areas. The graphics aren’t up to snuff. The people are pretty good, but they mostly reminded me of the NPCs in Skyrim; one expression, constant waving their arms, repeating the same lines over and over. The game is set in Oakmont, a city cut off from the States by an epic flood. Despite the game world being quite large, it isn’t very interactive. Most of the buildings are inaccessible, and several more can only be entered during specific missions. When they end, so does the access. There are several different areas, each supposed to represent a different people and culture. Instead it looks like the same block repeated over and over. There’s a little variation, but not much. And since you can only enter maybe one building per block, it matters little. The platforming is awful. You can’t jump, only mantle, and only in certain places. And you don’t fall gracefully. Even if you just walk off the curb, it’s either a predescribed falling motion—complete with a comical “oof”, which you definitely take damage from, no matter the height—or you just glitch to the bottom. The combat, if anything, is worse.

It’s a detective game—the combat seems to’ve been added as an afterthought. It’s point and shoot. Nothing more. There’s a auto-aim system that snaps to the target’s… groin. With the amount of damage done by each shot, and the scarcity of ammunition—it’s worse than useless. And since the auto-aim snaps to every enemy’s gut every time, you can’t really aim yourself. I mostly just ran away. And then stopped playing.

Wrap-up

So… next month should be busy. I have a backpacking trip scheduled with friends—all of which have backed out. And the place is reservation only (since it’s fairly popular), so I’ll have to go somewhere else. Dunno if I will. We’ll see. Lots of books to read, though. The amount and quality of books coming out in July is staggering. Unless they get delayed.

As usual, lemme know if you’ve read or played any of these, or are looking forward to anything else. I’d love to hear! Or maybe if you’re going on holiday anywhere fun. Or… is that a thing this year? Or are we just staying home and drinking? Let me know!