Book Loot – November Edition

A very light haul this month, but I need it to catch up on everything I fell behind on in the early fall. Chance that that happens? I’m going with… low, but possible. If nothing else, I shouldn’t fall further behind. Life continues to be just… exhausting this year, y’know? We’re almost done with 2020 (though my brain assures me that reaching an arbitrary “end” to the year won’t do any good or change anything—my mind is always optimistic and super helpful)—just a couple more months to go!

ARCs

The Rush’s Edge – by Ginger Smith (11/10)

Hal Cullen is an ex-supersoldier, grown in a vat and guaranteed little in the way of a life outside of war. Burned out and not long for life, Hal reluctantly takes a job salvaging ships to pass the time before his inevitable crash. But as he begins to grow close to a new crewmember, Hal starts to imagine a life outside of his vat-given one. And that’s when an alien presence takes over their ship and SHTF. Many thanks to Angry Robot (#TheRushsEdge, #AngryRobot) for the ARC!

Infernal – by Mark de Jager (Re-release • 11/26)

Stratus wakes in an unfamiliar place, with no memory of anything before but for the fact that he is not human. He does possess an incredible strength and the overwhelming will to survive. As he sets out across the war-torn land, Stratus will discover bits and pieces of his life before, all culminating in the burning desire for vengeance upon those that robbed him of his past. Many thanks to Rebellion for this reissue! It looks really good!

Purchases

Forest of Souls – by Lori M. Lee

My monthly audiobook credit went to the newest Lori M. Lee book that I’ve been planning on reading for half the year. I still have a bit of listening burnout, but we’ll see how it goes. With the power to cheat death, an army of living trees, and promised doses of action, heartache and intrigue, hopefully it’ll prove more than entertaining!

What are everyone’s plans for November? Anybody doing Nanowrimo, maybe shopping their memoirs, or bedding down for the remainder of the year (I know Tammy’s husband has something planned!)? I’ll admit, I’m tempted on that final one! And not only since it’s supposed to be -10˚F this week (that’s -23˚C just in case you were curious), and we’re supposed to get a foot of snow.

Book Loot – October Edition

I was a little late on the draw this month, but we got the October edition out as the month starts, so I’m counting that as a win. All been a bit sideways lately, which I’ll brief later, but right now let’s get into it!

ARCs

The Midnight Circus – by Jane Yolen (10/01)

Welcome to the Midnight Circus: the collected works of Jane Yolen combining the wicked, haunting, solemn and unbelievable all into one volume in which the Circus lurks in every plot or poem. Or so I’ve been told. Thanks to Tachyon and NetGalley for the eARC!

Once and Future Witches – by Alix E. Harrow (10/13)

As of 1893, witches are no more. And the modern woman finds nothing more scandalous to pursue than suffrage. When two sisters join the movement in New Salem, they bring to it old ideas and even older magics. But when hunted by forces that will not suffer a witch to live, they must delve into blacker arts still. And though 1893 knows no witches—it soon will. Many thanks to Redhook and Orbit for the eARC!

Phoenix Extravagant – by Yoon Ha Lee (10/20)

For generations, the Empire has spread across the world. Reliant on automata animated by powerful magical sigils and paints, it is a nigh unstoppable force. But when one of the magic painters sets out to discover the source of the Phoenix Extravagant, what they uncover will prove beyond their wildest dreams. Thanks to Solaris for the ARC!

The Tower of Fools – by Andrjez Sapkowski (Re-release • 10/27)

Reinmar must flee after being caught in bed with a knight’s wife. Pursued not only by the knight and his brother but also the Inquisition, Reinmar takes refuge in the Tower of Fools, an asylum for the insane. Many thanks to Gollancz and NetGalley for the eARC!

The Subjugate & The Sensation – by Amanda Bridgeman (10/13)

Welcome to the world of Salvi Brentt, a homicide detective that walks the beat between augmented killers and religious fanatics. A cyberpunk murder-mystery, I was sold on this as a concept right after I heard about it and can’t wait to dig in. Many thanks to Angry Robot for the ARC of the Sensation, as well as the inclusion of the Subjugate, the first in Brentt’s investigations.

Purchases

The Jade City – by Fonda Lee

The island of Kekon is the world’s only source of magical jade, able to imbue its few recipients with superhuman abilities. The Kaul Family makes up half of the two crime syndicates that lay claim to the isle, but when their rivals instigate a brutal clan war, the streets that were paved with green may instead turn red with blood.

The Black Company – by Glen Cook

The Black Company take their pay from the Lady, careful not to ask too many questions. But when prophecy arises, nothing will keep the mercs from pursuing it. Not the Lady, and not even their own doubts.

Life

I’ve fallen behind lately as work is in full swing and with the fall harvests and hunting season, I’m just not reading as much lately. Don’t have much free time for it. So I dunno how many of these ARCs I’ll get through this month, especially since I have to make up a few from September and the months prior. At the moment though, I still have November off, so maybe I’ll have time to catch up. Yeah… maaaybe.

So what’s been going on with y’all lately? Have you seen or read any of these, or do you want to? Be sure and let me know!

Crownbreaker – by Sebastien de Castell (Review)

I continue to be obsessed with the Hot Key covers, designed by the very talented Sam Hadley.

Spellslinger #6

Fantasy, YA

Hot Key Books; October 17, 2019

519 pages (Hardcover)

4.9 / 5 ✪

GoodreadsAuthor Website

Beware Possible Spoilers for the Queenslayer, and the other previous Spellslinger books!

Crownbreaker is the sixth and (for now, at least) final book in the Spellslinger series, wrapping up this tremendously entertaining series in a tidy manner. I put off reading it for a number of months for a number of reasons. First off, Queenslayer was a heck of a book, and I needed to take some time to digest its ending. Secondly, I wasn’t ready to reach the end of the road. I’m a firm believer that all stories must end, but that doesn’t mean I hadn’t grown to love the characters in this series—particularly Kellen and Reichis. I just wasn’t ready to say goodbye yet. The third reason, was the anticipation that was building for the final book. I’d heard a few things about Crownbreaker (including from a few of my friends who loved it), mostly good, but I was still somewhat dreading the conclusion. Would the author kill everyone off? Would he end the series in a cliffhanger? Would there be a Game of Thrones or Queen of Fire ending that worked to end the series, but sucked in every other way imaginable? I doubted de Castell would do any of these, honestly. My respect for him has grown greatly throughout the series. But while he’d provided some people with the ending they wanted, would he also give the characters the ending they deserved?

Something heavy thumped onto my chest, and a fuzzy face with beady eyes stared down at me. “You done lyin’ there yet? I’m hungry.”

After spending most of his adult life on the run, Kellen is slowly settling into his role as adviser to the Queen of Darome. Reichis, for his part, was born for courtly life. Bathing while being fed butter biscuits, being pampered by servants and royalty, and being constantly surrounded by an overwhelming variety of stealables is pretty much a dream come true. Plus, every now and then he gets to kill someone. Kellen is having a slightly harder time adapting. Getting arrested on a daily basis isn’t helping. The head of the Marshals—a striking, attractive young woman, Torian—wants him somewhere close where she can keep on eye on him. Somewhere like her quarters, or the oubliette.

My personal favorite butter biscuits, I ate them and thought of Reichis. Sadly, not in the bath.

But Kellen’s family is aware of his status at court. And they have plans for him. So when his father drops in, Kellen is less than surprised. The one man that he has spent his entire life running from stands before him, and demands a favor of him, Kellen is unimpressed. But Ke’heops is willing to welcome his son home—with a clean slate, a place within the clan, a proper mage name, and the pardoning of a certain Charmcaster as well—Kellen is entirely tempted. Until he hears what his father wants of him.

For a war is brewing on the continent. A child has been born in Berabesq, a child unlike any other. For this child is a living god. One that is sure to unite the nation beneath one flag. And when the country is one, they will roll over the continent, endangering Darome, Gitabaria and the Jan’Tep all equally. And so Kellen’s path is clear. To prevent this war—he must kill a god.

Just another reason I love the Hot Key books. This (and more) lovely picture adorns the page beginning each new section, courtesy of the equally talented Sally Taylor. Anyone know, are these also in the other versions?

This was actually my favorite installment in the series. Quite fitting that it comes at the end (But then—is it the end? I guess you’ll have to read it to find out!). Everything comes together in this final adventure. Now, it’s not perfect, but pretty much as close as anything that I’ve read this year. I don’t have anything to complain about, really. Heck, I read the last three hundred pages in one sitting. The beginning was just a bit slow, but that’s about all.

By this point in the series, there exist so many threads and potential guest stars that the author pretty much could’ve pulled one out of his hat every few chapters and still had enough left for the end. But, those that he did use, combined with the new characters he introduced in this book added up to create quite the ending, one that I’m not sure if he could’ve outdone even if he’d tried (I mean, I assume he tried. A little. But writing is pretty straightforward, right? Yup, pretty sure). In addition to all these guest stars and blindsides, there were still enough twists and turns that I kept genuinely being surprised throughout the second half (in a good way, btw) and where we ended up. Props to Sebastien de Castell for this!

Even more props for the emotional ride. I teared up more than once, and went back to reread my favorite sections before I’d even finished the book. I’m sad to see Kellen and Reichis go, along with so many more: Nephenia, Ferius, Shallan, Pan, the Queen, even Torian—but I’m happy that they all got the ending they deserved. An ending that the author even continued on in the post-script (which just isn’t done enough nowadays, and served as a pleasant surprise (which apparently I’ve just ruined for you, but), so I won’t give you any more details on it), and one that—while it didn’t tie everything together—did more than enough to reach a satisfying conclusion.

As always, nothing is stronger than the world and its characters. Leads that develop are a rare thing. Supporting characters that show depth are even rarer. But the author here has shown depth and development on a larger scale; all the characters within Spellslinger are capable of complex, even drastic change. Some progress in their development. Others regress. More do both. Kellen continues to shoot for the “man that Nephenia loves” version of himself. And Reichis just wants to eat eyeballs—though I don’t know why, they’re really a bit gristly and full of viscous liquid, even when cooked—and butter biscuits, a passion to which we all may aspire. Moreover, de Castell continues to paint such an amazing picture—one he leaves open to interpretation just enough for the reader to fill in their own gaps—and populate it with the most interesting, conniving characters imaginable. Though none of them more cynical than Kellen, of course. Cynical but trusting and cuddly as a bunny, that’s our Kellen.

TL;DR

This review probably could’ve just been a ramble about how much I enjoyed Kellen’s adventure and how much I’ll miss him in the days to come. I mean, it kinda was… but not like, entirely. I talked about how good the world-building and characters were. The development of Kellen and Reichis, and others was impressive. I mentioned how delicious butter biscuits are. I even included a photo of my favorite brand. Assuming that one has gotten this far in the review, only one reasonable question remains: have you read the series yet? And if not, WHY NOT? It’s amazing! The books even LOOK cool! I can’t recommend this fun, exciting, emotional rollercoaster enough.

On Tap 9/7

Currently Reading

Havenfall – by Sarah Holland

An interesting YA Fantasy regarding the crossroads of multiple worlds located in Colorado, which for some confusing reason doesn’t involve a stargate. The romance isn’t actually terrible, and the story is unique enough to me that I’m having no trouble reading it.

Bystander 27 – by Rik Hoskin

Like a mashup of the Reckoners and the Punisher. It reads a bit like a Peter Clines novel, albeit with some very dated language. And some serious repetition issues. But with an interesting mystery and an action-packed plot, it’s definitely entertaining!

Night Sky – by Robert Harvey

A lovely, LOVELY book about bits of the universe that you can see with your naked eye. While I have an ARC of the upcoming ebook version, now I totally want a hardcover of this! It has many, many BEAUTIFUL photos! I’m already recommending checking this out, if you like scifi or astronomy. Or just beautiful pictures.

Up Next

Seventh Perfection – by Daniel Polansky

A secret behind the God-King’s reign may unravel everything. But only those having completed the final perfection are privy to the secret, those closest and most dedicated to the God-King’s rule. I’m more than ready to get into this one!

Upcoming Reviews

These will all have reviews, I promise. Ish. I promise-ish.

Crownbreaker (that’s tomorrow!) was incredible, ditto with Network Effect, so just go read both of them! There we go, problem solved.

Also, I’ve been watching Let’s Plays of Tell Me Why, since I don’t have a XBox and WHY DON’T I HAVE AN XBOX I WANT TO PLAY THIS GAME NOW. Everyone have a good week!

Magebane – by Stephen Aryan (Review)

Age of Dread #3

Fantasy, Epic

Orbit Books; August 6, 2019

491 pages (PB)

4.3 / 5 ✪

GoodreadsAuthor Website

Contains spoilers for both Mageborn and Magefall. Also may contain possible spoilers for the Age of Darkness trilogy!

For a guy who hated one of my favorite books, Stephen Aryan can tell a pretty good story. His second trilogy set in this particular world, the Age of Dread continues what the Age of Darkness started, with magic, law, and the gods themselves coming to the forefront for this conclusion.

The Age of Darkness ended in an epic battle for the good of the world, but the Age of Dread features an epic struggle as well—this one for both gods and men. Having carved out a niche for themselves in the corner of Shael, Wren and the others now search for acceptance from a world that continues to hate and fear their kind. When a mysterious illness appears on the streets of Perizzi, it’s up to Tammy to make sure the virus spreads no further. But she fails as the city is soon quarantined, and are left with a choice—will they survive together, or die alone? As Munroe hunts the being that stole her family from her, nothing will stand in her way. Less justice, more vengeance; nothing will save Akosh when the mage catches up to her. For justice is all well and good, but some debts can only be paid in blood. Akosh has fallen far from the goddess she truly is. Hunted on all fronts, she is forced into an alliance with a being even more powerful and ancient than herself. And when even her once ally threatens to turn on her, Akosh must make the ultimate sacrifice to survive. Revealed as something more than mortal, Danoph know travels with Vargus, the one-time Weaver showing him the ropes. But what is Danoph’s task, exactly? And will he be able to fulfill it when the truth is revealed?

I know this was a fairly brief prompt compared to my usual ramble, but at the end of a six book series (that’s two trilogies), I’m not sure who’s where and how much I should be revealing. Hopefully I did a decent enough job of keeping it informative, yet also vague enough that anyone can jump right in.

I’ve really enjoyed these two trilogies—both the Age of Darkness and the Age of Dread—though I know they weren’t exactly giant successes. It seems most of the people I’ve talked to about them read one or two of the first trilogy, but thought they were decent at best, and then dropped off. Well, everyone’s allowed their own opinion, but it doesn’t really matter as I thought they were brilliant!

With five books preceding Magebane, there are so many paths diverging and converging that the story could almost end up anywhere. It was a brief disappointment when instead we arrived at two shared threads, but the conclusion was entertaining enough that I soon got over it. Though not as epic (in my opinion) as the finale of Chaosmage, the ending here was still impressive. An ultimate evil on one side, while a much different evil awaits on the other. It wasn’t exactly what I’d expected given the series’ history, but in some ways impressed me more given that it broke out of the mold it’d kept to up to this point.

The characters and world-building have been strong throughout the series, reaching an impressive zenith as all their threads collide. While we didn’t get as much exposure to either Sorcerer as I would’ve liked in this final book, enough of the other characters starred that I got over the slight—especially when I figured out what the author was up to. While the trilogies both feature so much of the affairs of gods and sorcerers; the world is not built upon them. It’s built on the backs of mortals. Or, I guess, ‘it is in men that we must place our hope.’ Many stories ended here, some are only getting started. I can’t wait to see where Aryan takes the story from here!

TL;DR

The Age of Darkness ended with a bang. The Age of Dread ends in much the same manner. Another epic conclusion concludes another epic series. Part of me was truly disappointed to see it end, but every story must come to an end. As they’ve struggled to adapt and overcome over the course of six books, the characters that emerge from Magebane have seen some things. They’ve been fleshed out, humanized, developed, grown, regressed, both most of all survived. Everything has led to this point—the end of an age. If you’ve not yet begun either series—I’d definitely recommend it. If you’re somewhere in the middle but on the fence about continuing—I’d still recommend it. If not, I understand; there’s always more to read 🙂

Book Loot – September Edition

Not a huge haul this month, but maybe it’ll give me an opportunity to catch up on some ARCs I’ve missed, maybe read some more of the Yarnsworld books or some stuff off my 2020 TBR. Or maybe there’ll be a late addition or two from my outstanding requests (I can hope—and there even was one last month). Oh, that and Fable, by Adrienne Young, (which comes out September 1th) which I’ve been looking forward to but got rejected every time I tried to beg for a copy. No matter.

ARCs

The Awkward Black Man – by Walter Mosley (US • 9/15) (UK • 10/1)

A collection of stories from amazing author Walter Mosley. I’m cautiously optimistic, as I’ve enjoyed his mystery fiction, but hated his science fiction. This is one author my Dad introduced me to, so even if I don’t like the stories, maybe he will. The good thing about an omnibus collection is that even if you don’t like one, maybe you’ll like another. Thanks to Grove Press for the eARC!

The Seventh Perfection – by Daniel Polansky (9/22)

An amanuensis (essentially a secretary-slave) of the God-King sets out to unravel one riddle central to the core of his reign. If she somehow completes her work, all of his rule might fall. But as she has achieved all Seven Perfections in order to become the God-King’s servant, it begs the question—can anyone really stop her? Much thanks to Tor for the copy! (Hopefully this means they’re warming up to me.)

The Kraken’s Tooth – by Anthony Ryan (9/30)

The Pilgrim and Seeker return in this sequel to A Pilgrimage of Swords, where the Pilgrim now seeks to claim a mythical blade for… some reason. I found the first entry unexpectedly entertaining, so my hopes are a bit higher for this second one. Many thanks to Subterranean Press for the ebook!

Bystander 27 – by Rik Hoskin

Some kind of vigilante meets Punisher is what sold me. When ex-Seal Jon Hayes’ wife is killed in a clash between two costumed super-“heroes” (well, one hero and one villain), he must step out of the shadows to get the vengeance he craves.

My first physical ARC! The first thing I did when I got it was text my family and friends—none of which responded with any kind of joy or excitement whatsoever. But I was still excited. Even though it’s already come out; I missed the period where I should’ve read it on NetGalley, so am stoked to get a second chance at it! Big thanks to Angry Robot for the copy!

Purchases

Havenfall – by Sarah Holland

I actually used my audio credit this month, on a YA I’ve been meaning to read. For Maddie, summers at the Inn at Havenfall are her only escape from the nightmare that is her regular life. Located at the crossroads of worlds, the Inn is a refuge for those that would seek to protect the world, and even those who seek to destroy it. But when the truce of the Inn is broken, Maddie must rush to restore the peace before war breaks out. And she must do it all while somehow convincing her uncle to keep her on after the summer. That is—if there’s an Inn to return to. Actually not bad so far, the YA romance isn’t very cringe-worthy even.

To Dream and Die as a Taniwha Girl – by Benedict Patrick

The final delivery from his Kickstarter back in June, Taniwha Girl is essentially the sequel to Benedict Patrick’s Where the Waters Turn Black. While I haven’t gotten to it yet, as previously mentioned, I hope this is the month I get to do a deep dive into Yarnsworld. While his debut was a bit of a mixed bag for me, I hope that this is one of those worlds that gets better with time and experience.

Life

So, work is starting back up here soon, which is nice. Though there’re a lot of new COVID rules which are just going to be a pain. Well, enforcing them is at least. But I know that it’s important, and that all the rules have been explained to the parents already, so that most of the hoaxers have been weeded out already (and yeah, there were a fair amount, actually). Thing is, I found that all my winter programs have been canceled, along with my part-timer, so I need to find something else after October. Which sucks, but oh well.

I also have some medical appointments and procedures (nothing too serious, mind) in early September, so I may just be MIA for a week or so around that time. Or I might just miss a week do to incurable lethargy, who knows?

Every Sky a Grave – by Jay Posey (Review)

Both covers are good, though I probably prefer the UK’s

The Ascendance #1

Scifi, Space Opera, Fantasy

Skybound Books; July 7, 2020

384 pages (ebook)

4.0 / 5 ✪

GoodreadsAuthor Website

I was kindly provided an advance-copy of the book in exchange for an honest review. Many thanks to Skybound Books and NetGalley for the ARC! All opinions are my own.

A planetary assassin from an all-women sect that wields a forgotten tongue as a weapon, Elyth was taught that her actions save lives and protect the universe from conflict and evil. Her order, the House of Ascendance, have been taught the Deep Language since they were young. Combined with the Herza—soldiers that wield advanced technology—they make up the two arms of the Ascendance, which rule the galaxy as a whole. Over millennia they have honed it to root and strife and dissidence from within, protecting the Ascendance from threats.

Elyth is a true believer, one that will do everything in her power to serve the Empire’s vision, even if it means giving her life in the process. Fresh from a successful mission to quell a planet on the verge of sedition, Elyth is sent to Qel, a world possibly infected by the Markovian Strain—a corrupted version of the Language, thought to have been wiped out.

See, there’s a reason why only women are trusted to learn the Deep Language. Years prior, a man named Varen Fedic began using the Language for evil, attempting to dominate the Empire for his personal rule. Though it started on Markov, the strain soon boiled over to other worlds, and the corruption spread. Together, the Herza and House were able to defeat and destroy the Strain, but its legacy of terror remains.

And so Elyth is sent to Qel to investigate.

Unfortunately, nothing goes to plan. When her ship crash-lands on Qel, Elyth is hunted like prey, barely able to get a sense of the world she has come to investigate. But that which she does only builds her disquiet. For whatever is happening on Qel is truly strange and mysterious, but despite all the warnings she received regarding the corruption of the Strain, Elyth begins to suspect what the House taught her—while certainly its truth—perhaps wasn’t the full story.

As with many other reviewers I’ve seen, I was quickly impressed by the world-building. From the very first chapter (which gives a taste of both the Language and the Ascendancy), I had no trouble imagining and detailing the adventure unfolding. Posey does an excellent job building up the world (or worlds), the hierarchy of its empire, and the ancient—yet still enigmatic—Deep Language. While I was prepared for it to be just another attempt at blunt words-of-power magic, it somehow manages to convey something more, an intricacy that’s intertwined with the foundations of the universe. What follows is a curious blend of space opera scifi and sorcerous fantasy that I enjoyed on two levels, and think will appeal to fans of either genre.

Unfortunately, the world-building is not without its flaws. While early on we are treated to a decent history lesson on the foundations of the world, throughout the text there are references that made me think that the author was holding out on me. While the Markovian Strain plays a huge part in the story, the history of the Ascendancy itself felt lacking—as it was hard to tell just how old or noble they really were. Though it’s not absolutely necessary to the events on Qel, I really feel it would’ve been helpful to compare the evilness of the Strain to something. Being told something is evil isn’t always enough; it’s often important to relate how or why it’s bad. While it…. urrrgghh. Okay. While the world-building was excellent, it often felt as though the history of the Ascendancy as it related to the story was lacking. Or incomplete. Does that make sense? It didn’t contract from the story, but felt like it was missing out on an opportunity to really bolster it.

Elyth is a strong lead, and her character development—while not the best ever—was quite something. A true believer from the outset, it’s interesting to watch her evolution as she discovers that while she was told the danger of the Strain, perhaps it wasn’t the whole truth. She’s a loyal and stubborn servant, but also an inquisitive and independent one. While she does whatever she can to fit her discoveries within the lines of what she believes, she never discounts anything out of hand, despite what it means for those beliefs. And so her evolution is interesting—whether it be progression or regression, even sometimes both.

I had little issue getting into Every Sky a Grave, but a slight problem in the middle. Action, stealth and tension war with philosophy as to which controls the pacing, but neither wins out. As such, the pacing was a bit odd at times, making it easy for me too rattle off fifty pages, only to take me a half hour to get through a dozen. While I never struggled to read this, it’s not exactly an action-packed thriller. There are periods of action, yes, but it’s all balanced with stealth, mystery, philosophy, and more. That wasn’t an issue for me, though it might be for you.

Though the conclusion wowed me (there was even a certain LOTR moment that brought chills), the lead-in to it was hit and miss. There were some unlikely events, some great ones, and even one that was a head-scratcher. All in all, however, it was a great adventure.

TL;DR

Every Sky a Grave combines in-depth world-building with strong dialogue and fascinating character progression to tell a tense, gripping story that somehow manages to incorporate both fantasy and science fiction, while committing to neither genre. The mysterious Deep Language is a unique magic-system, while its space-opera roots are evident in the world and its characters. With a strong female lead and an interesting story you should have little trouble getting into the read, though its second half struggles to decide between philosophy, action, and stealth—which really makes the pacing odd. At times I tore through pages, while others I had to read and reread sections to make sure I understood them. Despite this I thoroughly enjoyed Every Sky a Grave and look forward to the continuation of this new series, Posey’s best start since Three!

TBR – August

Currently Reading

Magebane – by Stephen Aryan (Age of Dread #3)

Magic is bad. That’s pretty much the tune of this series, if you haven’t been keeping up. The Age of Dread trilogy comes at the end of the Age of Darkness one, so essentially we’ve had six books leading up to this point. I have to give it too Steven Aryan—this one’s been hella entertaining and I can’t wait to see how it all comes out. This may not be grimdark, but it’s certainly more than a bit dark, and definitely a good enough series for me to recommend.

Top TBR for August

At the moment, Crownbreaker will be the next physical book on my plate, as finishing up series is starting to be a priority for me. I’ll definitely miss Kellen and Reichis, but if there’s ever a pair that could use an ending—happy or otherwise—it’s these two. Now, I had to stop Vengeful when my library loan kinda broke, so Havenfall looks like my next audiobook. I’m hoping this YA adventure will prove an interesting diversion from life (somewhat realistic as I’ve heard, but not much). Another series summary is Where Gods Fear to Go by Angus Watson, which features such lures as telekinetic sasquatch, annoying but entertaining Vikings, and well, other things. I’ve enjoyed the series thus far, and am certainly looking forward to the conclusion. I could probably put Blood of Empire on every single TBR for the year as I’m both excited to read it and frustrated that I haven’t gotten to it yet. The Autumn Republic is one of my favorite books ever, so I’m hoping that BoE will live up to its unreasonable standards.

TBR Finished Since Last

They Mostly Come Out at Night – by Benedict Patrick (Yarnsworld #1)

Age of Empyre – by Michael J. Sullivan (Legends of the First Empire #6)

• Network Effect – by Martha Wells (Murderbot Chronicles #5)

Of the three books I’ve finished off my TBR in the last month, Age of Empyre was the one that felt most satisfying. Though I probably enjoyed Network Effect more, there was just something about finishing off a series—especially one that spanned six books—that felt more special than continuing one other and starting a third. I start a heck of a lot more series than I ever finish, so when I’m able to go beginning to end on something that entertains me throughout, it’s quite the feeling of accomplishment. While there were some ups and downs, the Legends of the First Empire had a lasting appeal to see me through to the end, along with enough twists and turns to keep me guessing. Unrelated: If you’re wondering where my thoughts on Network Effect are, I um, haven’t gotten to them yet. It was good, though. That enough?

In other news, my gaming burnout continues, as I’ve unsuccessfully chucked a bunch of titles at it without anything sticking. I’m also sleeping a lot. Like, 10 hours a day a lot. Now, most people might have a problem with wasting their lives or something, but sleep is elusive enough for me that I don’t mind it at all. In fact, if I had another hour in the day, I’d probably try to spend it asleep. Plus with work (supposedly) starting again soon, I’m sure I’ll be losing it sooner or later.

Read anything off this month’s TBR? Thoughts, opinions, complaints? Anyone like sleep as much as I do? Hope y’all are doing well!

On Tap 8/09

I’m not even going to talk about the world right now. It’s still there. And full of people. Anyhow, reading:

Currently Reading

• Vengeful – by V.E. Schwab

Sequel to Vicious regards individuals that escaped death, but came back changed; extraordinary. Just not necessarily good. Jeremy Arthur is doing his best to bring this to life thus far, though the ultimate plot has yet to evolve. Unless it’s just wossname dying—in which case… meh.

• Every Sky a Grave – by Jay Posey

Planetary assassins wielding ancient power take center stage in this universe-spanning space-opera. Just getting back into it after a month away.

Up Next

• Havenfall – by Sara Holland

An Inn at the crossroads of four realms and a girl sworn to protect it. But when a dead body is found, Maddie must solve the mystery of the death before the peace is broken.

Gaming

• No Man’s Sky

Yeah, I waited for a bunch of the free updates before trying this. I’m hoping it’ll prove more of a successor to one of my all-time favs, EV Nova. So far, there’s a lot of exploration, a lot of crafting, but not much of any kind of guidance, like a plot. Not that it’s bad, but… am I missing something?

TBR – July 2020

For this month’s TBR, I thought I’d focus on how I’m doing on my 2020 TBR. And not (just) because it’s the last day of the month. Or (just) because, though most of my TBR is in physical books, I’ve only read 6 of those to date (somehow, depressingly).

READ

Queenslayer – by Sebastien de Castell

To Be Taught, If Fortunate – by Becky Chambers

Age of Death – by Michael J. Sullivan

Senlin Ascends – by Josiah Bancroft

Witchsign – by Den Patrick

The Bone Ships – by R.J. Barker

TOP 3
(Most Likely to Read)

Where Gods Fear to Go – by Angus Watson

The final book in the West of West trilogy finds the Hardworkers amidst the Shining Mountains, still trying to get to The Meadows, to save the world.

Crownbreaker – by Sebastien de Castell

Kellen has survived every challenge that’s been thrown in his (and Reichis’s) path. Now in the employ of the Daroman Queen, his life is tested yet again with the threat of continental war. And this war traces back to someone Kellen knows quite well, but to put an end to it he just might have to take the fight to them. But first he has to go home.

Magebane – by Stephen Aryan

Plague ravages the world. Darkness looms behind it, threatening to engulf all. Mages and men and gods alike must band together to stop the coming darkness—if it can be stopped.

NEXT 3
(somewhat likely to read)

Blood of Empire – by Brian McClellan

The Dynize have seized the Godstone, while Ben Styke has gone and invaded Dynize. Wars still wage and adventure still abounds in the final entry of the Gods of Blood & Powder.

After Atlas – by Emma Newman

Carlos Moreno’s life was changed when Atlas left earth to search for God among the stars. Now investigating the murder of one of the most powerful men on Earth, he must attempt to set his past aside to solve the crime. Though that may be more difficult than he’s ever imagined.

The Grey Bastards – by Jonathan French

Jackal commands the Grey Bastards, but his sights are set much higher than just that. However when all he has worked for seems set to come to fruition, something threatens to tear it all down. A captive, an elf girl, tests not only his loyalties, but his sense of self. Now Jackal must discover what it is he truly wants—and seize it.

LAST 3
(less likely to read this year)

Metro 2035 – by Dmitry Glukhovsky

The final Metro novel features the events of Metro: Last Light, with Artyom at the head trying to lead his people from the metro and back onto the surface at last.

Babylon’s Ashes – by James S.A. Corey

Earth has been crippled by the Free Navy. As the planet scrambles to right itself, life goes on in the rest of the solar system. But without—through the gate network—something lurks. What happens next may change everything and, as usual, James Holden is at the center of it.

The Shattered Crown – by Richard Ford

The King is dead. His daughter is untested, but now wears the Steel Crown. And a vast horde is descending upon the city.

Probably uhh Won’t Read This Year

Not that they’re bad, or that I don’t want to read them, just… I doubt I’ll get to them this year. For one reason or another, these three have dropped off my list.

Vengeful – by V.E. Schwab

Despite being killed, Victor is still angry. Despite being imprisoned, Eli is still forever. And they have so much to work out. I miiight get to this—I’m leaning towards reading it as an audiobook—but I’m not sure. I guess we’ll see.

The Spider’s War – by Daniel Abraham

I don’t remember what is happening exactly. And I’m not going to post any blurb here for fear of spoilers, and because it’s making little enough sense to me. I’m going to have to catch up, but I doubt I’ll have the patience for it this fall. Maybe if work keeps benching me…

The Flames of Shadam Khoreh – by Bradley P. Beaulieu

As Nikandr and Atiana continue to search for Nasim, the war on the isles still wages. In fact, it has spread to the mainland. But as the rifts and wasting grow stronger, the world itself may be threatened with destruction. Will Nikandr succeed in closing the rifts, or will the world change once and for all?

Additions

What fun would it be if you finished one list just to find nothing more beyond it? Luckily, I doubt this’ll ever happen to me! My TBR is stacked several deep. Here are just a few I’ve added (provisionally) to my 2020 Autumn schedule.

Every Sky a Grave – by Jay Posey

Elyth is a planetary assassin that wields the mystical Language of the Universe, to do strange and impossible things. But when another power emerges, manipulating this Language in ways Elyth has never conceived, it will be up to her to… change that? Pretty sure it’s something like that. And maybe save the universe as well.

Forest of Souls – by Lori M. Lee

The story of a girl whose life’s ambition is cast aside when her best friend is killed—and when she somehow returns them to life. Now she must master her abilities in time to prevent a war from breaking out.

Those Brave, Foolish Souls from the City of Swords – by Benedict Patrick

Though the third book published, Yarnsworld can be enjoyed in any order. Thus, when bandits attack a distant village, Arturo joins forces with an outcast and a legend to attempt the impossible, to traverse the dark wilderness and prove that in the City of Swords, true heroes can rise from the unlikeliest of places.

Expect a proper TBR in the middle of next month. Not saying I’ll make that, just that I’ll try, and that you should expect it. Ish.